Though you do not see him: OMF April 2017

“Though you have not seen him, you love him. Though you do not now see him, you believe in him and rejoice with joy that is inexpressible” (1 Peter 1:8)

As Peter writes to the believers scattered across the Roman empire in the first century he is well aware of the challenges that they face. For many the pressure to conform would have been immense and the risk of identifying as a believer in the crucified Messiah would have been high. Continue reading

Being sent at Christmas: OMF December 2016

“And the word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory” (John 1:14)

One of the things which struck me most as we landed back in London on the 18th of December 2014 was the vast amount of things there were to see at this time of year. Commercial Christmas was everywhere to be seen in a way that it was not in Bangkok. Lights, trees, various decorations, seasonal drinks at Starbucks… It was all there and it was quite overwhelming. Continue reading

Glorious things of you are spoken: OMF Prayer diary Nov 2016

 “Glorious things of you are spoken, O city of God” (Psalm 87:3) 

Cities are fascinating places. They are usually very busy and full of noise. People gather together to socialise, to work, to explore and to create a sense of identity for themselves. And in the midst of these activities a culture is formed uniting the various threads of diversity that the city attracts to itself. Continue reading

Mission Mondays: The Parade of the Athletes and the Song of Heaven

Another four years has passed already bringing with it the beginning of the Olympic games and I for one love watching the competition. It is a great spectacle, whether we like sport or not, as we see all of the different nations of the world gathering together to compete. Some arrive with high expectations of winning medals, other come knowing that just to be there is a great honour. Continue reading

Exiles in the everyday

Our world thrives on material things. For some parts of the world, predominantly westernised nations, it is to consume and to consume some more. For other parts of the world, predominantly the two-thirds majority world, the idea of such a life and existence is the dream which is flaunted before them. Coupled with this is the fame game. The desire for other people to know our name, for them to hold us in high regard, that is something worth living for! And sadly, even within the church, the lure of the material and the desire for self-aggrandisement is never too far away.  Continue reading